Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Curren$y - Weekend at Burnie's - New Mix Tape - Review by ALLHIPHOP.COM




RATING: 7/10

Curren$y (@Currensy_Spitta) is prepared to release his sixth studio album, or as Curren$y puts it, “a commercial mixtape,” on June 28. Weekend At Burnie’s (Jet Life/Warner Bros.) is very much a 'Curren$y album,' as he is primarily the project’s only voice along with some supporting features from his Jet Life family, like Young Roddy, Trademark Da Skydiver, International Jones, and Fiend. The album’s production comes mostly from Monsta Beatz, who supplies eight of the 12 tracks; other producers like Rahki, Havoc, Magnedo7, and Dirk Pate are also along for the ride.

The first track from Weekend At Burnie’s, “#JetsGo,” is also one of the singles. It kicks in with a soulful, string-based introduction that reminds us of the opening credits for a film. Lines like “twistin them Ferngully trees, b***h breathe / your man smoking good, I’m smoking great / T-H-C, Tony the Tiger certified these flakes,” are all over this track and provide some laughs with the analogies Curren$y makes.
The “movie” continues with “Still” which features Young Roddy and Trademark over the first Monsta Beatz-produced track on Weekend, where both guests hold their own alongside Spitta, and overall, the track serves as one of the album’s standouts. The next track, “She Don’t Want A Man,” which is co-produced by Havoc and Magnedo7, serves as the albums other single. The “cloudy” sounding track’s hook explains exactly what the song is about: “She don’t want a man, she just wanna f**k / he tell her balance the check book, I tell her roll the weed up / She don’t want a man, she just wanna f**k / he tell her to drop his kids over / I tell her pick my homies up.”
Monsta Beatz produces the next four tracks on Burnie’s as well, with the standouts being: “You See It” and “On G’s,” which features Young Roddy and Trademark. On “You See It,” you get the three things Spitta is best known for rapping about: cars, women, and weed. This is truly an anthem for all the “J.E.T.S.”
The album closes out with tracks like “Money Machine,” “What’s What,” “JLC,” and “Get Paid,” which also features Young Roddy and Trademark. Three of these four tracks all fit well, especially “Money Machine” with its piano-laced beat and “monk-like” chanting in the background. “JLC” is the least effective song on this project, as it almost becomes too standard of a Curren$y track, where it sounds like he is not really trying to do anything more than get to the end of the song.
Conclusion:
Weekend At Burnie’s, which clocks in at just under 40 minutes, is for the most part what you would expect from a Curren$y project, and there is nothing wrong with that. However, those looking for lyrical growth and development will be mildly disappointed, as this is a collection of songs from the Curren$y we have all grown accustomed to and expect from him. If his goal was to provide fans and listeners with an album to literally cruise to this summer, then he succeeded. The album provides the smooth and soulful production fans are used to, and the lyrical content that has made him one of Hip-Hop’s most consistent and entertaining voices. 

Must Hear: #JetsGo, Still, She Don’t Want A Man, You See It, On G’s

Skip: JLC